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Obesity is a leading cause of disability among children and adolescents.

Obesity is a leading cause of disability among children and adolescents.

The obesity epidemic has been blamed for hundreds of millions of Americans suffering, as do countless other chronic illnesses, and will continue to be linked to health issues and preventable diseases. But more Americans, including the majority of women, continue to experience high levels of diabetes and heart disease.

Obesity is a leading cause of disability among children and adolescents in the United States. The prevalence of diabetes and heart disease has doubled since 1999, and the rate of death is estimated to be more than 20 people annually. The top 10 medical conditions were all found to cause death in 2002 from non-communicable diseases, and the number that increased is the number of deaths due to other diseases. The CDC reports that over 4 million children who fall ill are at risk of losing the lives of their parents and friends to diseases that make their health miserable.

Many of the more common diseases and conditions in the world today are linked to obesity:

1. Diabetes

2. Cancer

3. Heart disease

4. Obesity

5. Kidney failure

6. Cancer

7. Diabetes

8. Aged children

9. Heart failure

10. Dementia

This type of cardiovascular disease also affects children over time. Diabetes rates in children are higher among those who are over 40 years old, and those who are older than 40 tend to have high rates of it. Diabetic children have a higher rate of diabetes than other groups, and over time, their risk of being diagnosed with that disorder has decreased, as have other physical, mental, and behavioral problems.

Females of all ages and gender are more likely to have a heart attack, which is also a cause for concern. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, heart attacks and strokes are the leading cause of death among American children under five years old.

Women younger than 45 are more likely to have an overweight or obese father—a link that is still largely ignored, especially since the government’s current definition of “obesity” has changed little from 1981. The CDC has now stated that 25 percent of American households lack sufficient physical strength and sufficient strength for life, but it is true that this is not completely true of women younger than 45.

Men of this age cohort have an obesity rate that is nearly four times higher than those of women under age 25.